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Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 Review

If you're looking for a toasty warm infrared space heater, this is an excellent choice
Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968
Credit: Laura Casner
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Price:   $130 List | $118.00 at Amazon
Pros:  Great remote, has wheels, elementary controls
Cons:  Bulky, no oscillation
Manufacturer:   Dr. Infrared Heater
By Ross Patton and Austin Palmer  ⋅  Jan 17, 2022
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56
OVERALL
SCORE


RANKED
#7 of 12
  • Personal Heat - 40% 5.0
  • Convenience - 30% 7.0
  • Small Room - 20% 5.0
  • Power Consumption - 10% 5.0

Our Verdict

If you're in the market for a space heater but don't want a model that creates a lot of breeze and noise, the Dr. Infrared Heater is a good choice. The controls are very intuitive and simple to use, as are the buttons on the remote. We love that this type of heater doesn't heat the air — rather, it emits infrared energy that radiates heat in the direct line of sight of the heating element. This means more warmth and less hot air blowing around and dropping the humidity.

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Overall Score Sort Icon
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Pros Great remote, has wheels, elementary controlsRaises temperatures quickly, great remote, takes up very little floor spaceFantastic performance, convenient features, fall-over protectionGreat heat output, tip over protection, remote controlCompact, affordable, doubles as a fan
Cons Bulky, no oscillationNo fan-only setting, keeps running when knocked overNo fan-only optionLoud fan, slow to warm upLacks features and settings, mediocre performance
Bottom Line If you're looking for a toasty warm infrared space heater, this is an excellent choiceIf you need a device that cranks up the heat and has a small footprint and a variety of convenient features, this is a fantastic choiceA solid option that offers exceptional overall performance at a great priceA simple, user-friendly model that performs well but has higher operational costsIf you need a small, barebones space heater on a budget, this is our recommendation
Rating Categories Dr. Infrared Heater... Lasko Ceramic Digit... Comfort Zone Oscill... Comfort Zone Cerami... Amazon Basics 1500W
Personal Heat (40%)
5.0
9.0
8.0
6.0
6.0
Convenience (30%)
7.0
7.0
7.0
8.0
4.0
Small Room (20%)
5.0
6.0
5.0
6.0
5.0
Power Consumption (10%)
5.0
4.0
5.0
4.0
4.0
Specs Dr. Infrared Heater... Lasko Ceramic Digit... Comfort Zone Oscill... Comfort Zone Cerami... Amazon Basics 1500W
Model DR-698 755320 CZ523RBK CZ499R 1500W
Measured Temperature Increase at 60 Minutes 8.6 10.8 9.9 12.1 10.1
Remote Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Fallover Protection Yes No Yes Yes Yes
Oscillator No Yes Yes Yes No
Fan-Only Setting No No No Yes Yes
Thermostat User Interface Digital Digital Digital Digital Dial
Watts 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500

Our Analysis and Test Results

The Dr. Infrared Heater is a decent, averagely performing space heater. The beauty of infrared space heaters is that they don't actually heat the air, instead they emit infrared radiation that warms objects in the direct line of sight of the heating element. This type creates a feel that is less dry and breezy than ceramic models.

Performance Comparison


Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater
Credit: Laura Casner

Personal Heat


We divided the personal heating metric into two parts — how well each heater fits and operates underneath a desk and how well they work in a living room setting.


Although this device does a good job of producing warmth, it doesn't make a ton of sense to use it underneath a desk, as it has a large footprint. In fact, it wouldn't comfortably fit underneath an average-sized desk.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater - the dr. infrared takes up a bit too much space to be used underneath...
The Dr. Infrared takes up a bit too much space to be used underneath a desk.
Credit: Laura Casner

It performs about average in living room settings. We found that right around five feet away, the Dr. has a sweet spot, making it perfect for use near couches and chairs.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater - the dr. infrared is the perfect choice for larger areas, such as a...
The Dr. Infrared is the perfect choice for larger areas, such as a family room or a workshop.
Credit: Laura Casner

Convenience


To measure convenience we looked at a multitude of settings and features — we noted if the heaters had remotes, if the controls were intuitive to use, and if there were any special elements that set any of the models apart from the others.


The Dr. Infrared is very strong when it comes to convenience. Regrettably, this style of heater doesn't offer any sort of oscillation, but it makes up for this shortcoming in other ways. The included remote has the functions of each button spelled out rather than using often confusing symbols like many other models.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater - the remote is especially easy to understand and operate.
The remote is especially easy to understand and operate.
Credit: Laura Casner

Although the Dr. is one of the bulkiest space heaters that we've tested, it does have wheels that aid in mobility, provided that the surface you are using the heater on is concrete, hardwood, tile, or thin carpet.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater - the small caster wheels alleviate some of the mobility issues of the...
The small caster wheels alleviate some of the mobility issues of the DR-968.
Credit: Laura Casner

The timer setting has one hour increments, and it goes all the way up to 12 hours. We find the option to set the timer for this length of time to be especially useful for long, cold nights or ensuring that you'll be coming home to a toasty room after a day of winter adventuring.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater - the digital user interface on the dr. infrared is easy to read from...
The digital user interface on the Dr. Infrared is easy to read from the other side of the room.
Credit: Laura Casner

Small Room


To gain objective data, we used a laboratory-grade thermometer to measure how much warmth each heater was able to add to a 161 square foot room in 20 minute increments over a total period of an hour. We made sure that the outside temperature, as well as the temps in adjacent rooms, were close to the same for each model's test.


During our small room assessment, the Dr. Infrared did fairly well. Starting with a room temperature of 62.4 degrees, this space heater was able to raise the temperature 8.6 degrees in one hour. The first 20 minutes of operation was especially impressive — it brought the room temperature up 5.2 degrees during this relatively short period.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater
Credit: Austin Palmer

Power Consumption


To determine energy costs, we used a wattmeter to measure the amount of kilowatts each device consumes in an hour. We are then able to take this number and multiply it by the national average price of a kilowatt per hour to project costs for periods such as 10 hours, a month, six months, or a year.


The Dr. Infrared is a moderately efficient space heater. At the time of this review, the average energy cost in kilowatts per hour in the United States was 13 cents. After 10 hours of heating on full blast, it used 13.3 kWh, which translates to $1.75 in costs for that period. If you run it for 10 hours per day for 30 days, it would cost you $52.50. Even running around the clock for a month, the going rate for running this model will be approximately $120 — this is relatively cheap to operate considering that it's a 1500 watt device.

Dr. Infrared Heater DR-968 space heater - we used a wattmeter to measure kilowatts per hour of consumption for...
We used a wattmeter to measure kilowatts per hour of consumption for each space heater.
Credit: Laura Casner

Value


The Dr. Infrared is a bit on the pricey side, but considering the functionality of this type of space heater and its great deal of efficiency, it's a solid choice. That said, ceramic element heaters are generally cheaper than infrared models, so if the price is a deciding factor for you, it might make sense to go with a cheaper model.

Conclusion


The Dr. Infrared is a decent infrared space heater. Although it lacks oscillation, it does a decent job at heating a small room. It's perfect for use in a living room, and we loved the controls on the remote and on the heater itself.

Ross Patton and Austin Palmer

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